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iWild: For more see iWild.org

Low-Lying Island off Bangladesh Goes Missing, Victim of Climate Change

With news that a small island in the Bay of Bengal has sunk under the rising waves of global warming, iWild highlights one of Bangladesh’s Endangered All-Stars, the Asian Short-Clawed Otter. Listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN’s Red List, this small otter makes a living off of crabs, molluscs, and crustraceans—which  Read More 
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Japan Opposes All Protection for Ocean Species

Questions have arisen about the effectiveness of CITES, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species: During the 2010 meeting in Doha, Qatar, the Convention has voted against protections for bluefin tuna, red corals, and sharks. TRAFFIC and the World Wildlife Fund have criticized CITES’ failure to restrict trade that seems destined to wipe out  Read More 
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Dan Janzen on "The Real Killer of Conservation"

“Apathy is the real killer of conservation. You know, I’m 71 years old. So I’ve seen [biodiversity] go from vibrancy all around us — wild forests everywhere — to trashed and void landscapes in my lifetime. So I remember what it was like when there was primary forest right up to the side of the  Read More 
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110 Left

Keeping the spotlight on World Water Day, the Mississippi Sandhill Crane, Today’s Endangered All-Star, is a genetically distinct and critically-endangered species that has suffered the equivalent of its house burning down, over and over again. The unique wet pine savannahs of the American south have been magically turned into housing tracts, highways, and  Read More 
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Dan Janzen Talks Turkey in Yale Environment 360

Be sure not to miss Caroline Fraser’s interview with Daniel Janzen, who has real answers about how to reform what’s wrong with conservation (fundraising run amok), how to beat apathy, and how to save the tropics. And congratulations to Yale Environment 360: Winner of best video, for Leveling Appalachia, on mountaintop removal, in  Read More 
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On World Water Day, A Quarter of World’s Sockeye Salmon Endangered

Today, March 22, is World Water Day, reminding us that both fresh- and saltwater ecosystems are in peril the world over. The fate of Pacific Sockeye Salmon, Today’s Endangered All-Star, lies in rivers, lakes, wetlands, and oceans, making it the perfect Poster Fish for their protection and restoration. Although some Sockeye populations remain in  Read More 
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Trouble Ahead for Tiny Cat

Breaking news highlights the threat to Southeast Asian wetlands: A mysterious, little-known species, the Flat-Headed Cat, Today’s Endangered All-Star, is even more threatened that previously believed because few forested wetlands in the region are currently protected. The BBC reports that a new study published in PLoS ONE has found that only ten to  Read More 
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Monarch Butterfly

Today’s All-Star is not endangered, but its migration is: While the Monarch Butterfly is considered common, its unique winter migration is under threat, crippled by climate change and unsustainable logging in Mexico, where it overwinters. While the IUCN has not assessed the threat to the species, the organization does considered its migration at  Read More 
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Better Than Beckham

The highly-unusual African Wild Dog, Today’s Endangered All-Star, hunts so cunningly and cooperatively that it is featured on a Botswana stamp in honor of the 2010 World Cup, standing on a soccer ball. Once covering most of sub-Saharan Africa in numbers that may have reached a half million, the Wild Dog is endangered, reduced  Read More 
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The Great Condor Comeback

A pair of California Condors, Today’s Endangered All-Stars, are tending the first condor nest in the state’s Pinnacles National Monument in a hundred years. Biologists at Pinnacles, in the Gabilan Mountains east of the Salinas Valley, confirmed that Female 317 and Male 318 courted for “nearly a month” before an egg was laid. 57 days  Read More 
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